BACK DOOR Newsletter on East Timor home

"Politics – the organic, intellectual and moral systems necessary for the organization of society through government processes of the state and the organs and institutions through which the state functions – has a direct relationship to criminal justice. The state defines crimes and imposes punishment on offenders through laws enacted by politicians for the maintenance of public order and enforced by a system of justice. While political philosophies – the place and order of values and the principles of political obligation (why people should or should not obey political authority) – differ, there are now widely recognized international norms of rights, justice, and freedom.  This conference will examine the inter-relationship of politics and criminal justice systems at local, national and international levels." International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law

SUMMARY:
 

Conference: “Politics, Crime and Criminal Justice”

International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law

Final day of the conf: Emphasis on East Timor: Restoration of criminal justice systems & development of international criminal justice systems.

For information regard the conference please contact:
ISRCL Secretariat, Suite 1000, 840 Howe Street,
Vancouver, BC, V6Z 2MI Canada
email: secretariat@isrcl.org website: http://www.isrcl.org
Tel:(601) 643-1252  fax: (604) 643-1200

The Opening Plenary will be held at the Old Parliament House, with the Opening Reception to follow immediately after across the street at the High Court of Australia.
Remaining plenaries and workshops will be held at the Rydges Lakeside Canberra Hotel unless otherwise specified in future versions of the Programme.
Canberra, Australia

26-30 August 2001

The 15th International Conference of the International Society for the Reform of  Criminal Law will be held in Canberra from 26-30 August 2001. The conference on the theme of “Politics, Crime and Criminal Justice” will examine the inter-relationship of politics and criminal justice systems at local, national and international levels.

The final day of the conference will consider the restoration of criminal justice systems following the collapse of civil authority and the development of international criminal justice systems with a specific emphasis on East Timor.
 

THURSDAY 30TH AUGUST

DAY THEME:  Politics Gone Mad - Restoring Criminal Justice Systems following the Collapse of Civil Authority and the Development of International Criminal Justice Systems

Recent years have seen the collapse of civil authority in  states in several regions of the world.  Attempts to restore criminal justice systems in Haiti, Bosnia, Kosovo and East Timor have differed but there are also many lessons learned after each such experience.  This day’s sessions will focus on the situation in East Timor, with insights from and comparisons to other international initiatives to restore justice systems in areas of civil strife.  The development of ad hoc international criminal tribunals and a permanent international criminal court will also be discussed.

09h00 – 10h30 Plenary 8: The Collapse of Order in East Timor
This plenary will examine the events relating to the crisis in East Timor surrounding the widespread violence and serious human rights violations there after the popular consultation on the future status of East Timor on 30 August 1999.

10h30 – 11h00 Tea/Coffee Break

11h00 – 120h30 Plenary 9: The Administration of Criminal Justice under the East Timor UN Transitional Administration (UNTAET) and Processes to Investigate and Address Serious Human Rights Violations in East Timor
This plenary will examine the conduct of investigations of the human rights violations and violations of international humanitarian law in East Timor during the period from January 1999, identifying and prosecuting the persons responsible for those violations as well as the administration of criminal justice under the UNTAET regime.

12h30 – 14h00  Lunch

14h00 – 16h30  Workshops
Workshop A3 International Criminal Courts
Workshop B3 International Commission of Inquiry on East Timor
Workshop C3 Conducting Police Investigations in East Timor and Other “International Crisis Jurisdictions”
(While there will be no refreshment break, coffee/tea will be available from 15h00-16h00).

16h30 – 17h15 Conference Closing Michael Hill, Q.C.
President, International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law

20h00 – 23h00   Conference Dinner



 

DETAILS:
 

15th International Conference

POLITICS, CRIME AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Canberra, Australia
26 – 30 August 2001

CONFERENCE CHAIR

HON. JUSTICE MARY GAUDRON
High Court of Australia
Canberra, Australia

CONFERENCE ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Programme Chair:  Damian J. Bugg, Q.C., Director,Commonwealth of Australia Director of Public Prosecutions
Wendy Abraham, Q.C,Deputy Director, Public Prosecutions, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Duncan Chappell, Deputy President, Administrative Appeals Tribunal, Sydney, NSW, Australia
The Hon. Justice J.A. Coldrey, Supreme Court of Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
N.R. Cowdery, Q.C.,Director of Public Prosecutions, State of New South Wales,  Sydney, NSW, Australia
Marshall Irwin, National Crime Authority, Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Hon. Justice Gregory R. James , Supreme Court of New South Wales, Sydney , NSW, Australia
Kathy M. Mack, Associate Professor, School of Law, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Chief Justice Jeffrey A. Miles, Supreme Court of The A.C.T, Canberra, ACT, Australia
Dr. P. Moyle, Faculty of Law, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia
Philip G. Scales, A.M., Solicitor, Scales & Partners, Adelaide, SA, Australia
The Hon. Justice G.F. Scott, Supreme Court of Western Australia, Perth, WA,  Australia
Hon. Justice Frank Vincent, Supreme Court of Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Her Honour Judge M. A. Yeats, District Court of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia
 

CONFERENCE FACULTY

Conference Chair: Hon. Justice Mary Gaudron, High Court of Australia
Professor Norman Abrams, Vice-Chancellor, UCLA, USA
Gus Andree Wiltens, Serious Fraud Office of New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand
Michael Adams, Law Reform Commission of New South Wales, Australia
Prof. Sara Sun Beale, Duke University, USA
Daniel Bellemare QC, Assistant Deputy Attorney-General (Criminal Law), Department of Justice, Canada
Graeme Blewitt, Deputy Prosecutor, International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Justice Bernard Bongiorno, Supreme Court of Victoria, Australia
Rt. Hon. Colin Boyd QC, The Lord Advocate , Scotland
Superintendent Mal Brammer, New South Wales Police/Independent Commissioner Against Corruption, NSW
Damian Bugg, QC, Director, Commonwealth of Australia Director of Public Prosecutions, Australia
Commissioner Brendan Butler, Criminal Justice Commission, Queensland
Nicholas Cowdery QC, DPP, New South Wales, President of International Association of Prosecutors
Garry Crooke, QC Chair, National Crime Authority, Australia
Robert Davidson, QC, Barrister, Edmonton, Canada
Vincent Del Buono, formerly Amnesty International, London, England
Professor Ian Dobinson, University of Hong Kong
Tina Dolgopol, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia
Hon. Justice John Dowd, Supreme Court of New South Wales, Australia
Professor Albin Eser, Director, Max Planck Institute, Freiburg, Germany
Superintendent Peter German, RCMP, Vancouver, Canada
Matthew Goode Esq, Attorney-General’s Dept. of South Australia, Member:  Model Criminal Code Officer’s Committee
Professor Andrew Goldsmith, Flinders University, South Australia
Michael Hill, Q.C, Barrister, and President - ISRCL, London, England
Edward Hoseah,Prevention of Corruption Bureau, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania
Lindy Jenkins, Law Reform Commission Western Australia, Perth, Australia
Justice Nico Jörg, Advocate General, Supreme Court of Netherlands
Commissioner Mick Keelty, Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police
The Honourable Duncan Kerr, Shadow Minister for Justice, Customs and Population (Australia)
Justice Michael Kirby, AC CMG, High Court of Australia
Tony Krone, formerly of the Attorney-General’s Department, Canberra
Chief Justice David Malcolm, Supreme Court of Western Australia
Colin McDonald, QC, Barrister, Darwin, Northern Territory Australia
Greg Melick, SC, Barrister, former Member of the National Crime Authority of Australia
Chief Justice Jeffrey Miles, Supreme Court of ACT, Australia
Elizabeth Montano, Director Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC)
Prof. Madeline Morris, Duke University, Charlotte, NC, USA
Professor Paul Moyle, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
Justice Prof. Hans Nijboer, Leiden University, Netherlands
Chudi Ojukwu, Counsel of Legal Education Nigerian Law School, Lagos, Nigeria
Chief Justice John Harber Phillips, Supreme Court of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
Grant Poulton, Director, Corruption Prevention - Independent Commission Against Corruption, Australia
Prof. Robert Puglsey, Southwestern University School of Law, Los Angeles, USA
Prof. Paul Robertshaw, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK
Prof. Pamela-Jane Schwikkard, Law Reform Commission of South Africa
Hans-Jorg Strohmeyer, United Nations Officer for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs,New York, USA
Donald J. Sorochan, QC, Barrister, and Treasurer of ISRCL, Vancouver, Canada
Ian Temby,  QC, former Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions, Senior Counsel, Sydney Bar, Australia
Prof.  Louise Viau, Faculty of Law, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
Hon. Justice Frank Vincent, Supreme Court of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
Prof.  Clive Walker, University of Leeds, Leeds, England
Hon. Justice Mark Weinberg, Federal Court of Australia
Hon. Daryl Williams, AM QC MP, Attorney-General for Australia
Rosalind Wright, C.B., Director, Serious Fraud Office, London, England
Judge Mary Ann Yeats, District Court of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
 

PROGRAMME
THEME OF CONFERENCE

Politics – the organic, intellectual and moral systems necessary for the organization of society through government processes of the state and the organs and institutions through which the state functions – has a direct relationship to criminal justice.  The state defines crimes and imposes punishment on offenders through laws enacted by politicians for the maintenance of public order and enforced by a system of justice.  While political philosophies – the place and order of values and the principles of political obligation (why people should or should not obey political authority) – differ, there are now widely recognized international norms of rights, justice, and freedom.  This conference will examine the inter-relationship of politics and criminal justice systems at local, national and international levels.

SUNDAY, 26th AUGUST                                                Opening Day at Old Parliament House
Noon – 17h00  Registration
13h00 – 14h00  ISRCL Board of Directors Meeting
15h30 – 16h00   Opening Address
16h00 – 17h30   Plenary 1: Conference Overview
This plenary will provide an overview of the issues to be raised throughout the conference.
18h00 - 19h30   OPENING RECEPTION          at Court House(across street from Old Parliament House)
             Hosted by High Court of Australia
 

MONDAY 27TH AUGUST

DAY THEME:  Corruption – Politics Gone Bad

The rule of law is fundamental to all democracies.  Corruption of public officials attacks the premise of the rule of law that all are equally subject to, and entitled to the protection of, the law.  Corruption subverts democratic institutions and undermines national and international economies.  Unchallenged, corruption undermines stability and threatens the foundations of any civil society, its judicial and financial systems, its legislative bodies, its police and its military.  Ultimately, international corruption unchecked endangers the stability of all states.  The conference will focus this day’s discussions on local, national and international responses of criminal justice systems to the threat of corruption.

08h00 – 09h00  Registration                            All sessions at Rydges Canberra Lakeside Hotel

09h00  – 09h30 Keynote Address

09h30 – 10h30 Plenary 2:  The Threat of Corruption to the Institutions and Economies of States
This plenary will examine the threat to the state of corruption in its many forms, including: impeding free competition via favoritism, nepotism or cronyism; the influence of policy, legal or administrative decisions by bribing public officials, through illicit campaign contributions or illegal lobbying; the sale of state assets at less than market prices; the subversion of the state through the huge profits from the illicit drug trade; and the plundering of state assets by corrupt politicians.

10h30 - 11h00  Tea/Coffee Break

11h00 – 12h30 Plenary 3:  Measures to Combat Corruption at the Local, National and International Level
This plenary will examine the international treaties, cooperative measures, and  programs that have been adopted, are contemplated,  or are needed to combat corruption internationally. The plenary will also consider the measures implemented, and present activities undertaken, to address corruption at the national level of jurisdictions throughout the world.

12h30 - 14h00  Lunch

14h00 - 16h30   Workshops
Workshop A1  Anti-Corruption Commissions
Workshop A2 Recovering the Fruits of Corruption: International Money Laundering Initiatives
Workshop A3 Effective Techniques for Detecting, Investigating, and
Prosecuting Corruption
Workshop A4 International Legal and Judicial Cooperation
(While there will be no refreshment break, tea/coffee will be available 15h00-16h00).

Free Evening
 

TUESDAY 28TH AUGUST

DAY THEME:  Balancing Political Power through an Independent Justice System
– the Independence of Police, Prosecutors and the Judiciary

Democratic nations separate the powers of the state into the judicial, executive and legislative branches so that there is a balancing of power.  The vital importance of an independent judiciary - a judiciary that is independent of popular and political pressures and decides cases based on the facts and the law - is well recognized internationally.  Equally vital to the integrity of the criminal justice system are an independent and incorruptible police and a prosecution authority that, where the evidence justifies doing so and only where the evidence justifies doing so, prosecutes without fear or favour.  The conference will focus this day’s discussion on these issues and the inter-relationship of police, prosecutor and judiciary in the criminal justice system.

08h15 – 09h00  Registration

09h00 – 10h30 Plenary 4: The “Appropriate” Relationship Between an Independent Police and an Independent Prosecutorial Authority
This plenary will consider the duty of an independent police to carry out law enforcement duties in accordance with the rule of law and not as an instrument of the political party in power.  The role of an independent prosecutorial authority to make charging and other decisions in relation to a prosecution and the inter-relationship of the independent functions of police and prosecutor will also be discussed.  The plenary will also examine the role of the elected law officers of the state in this process.

10h30 – 11h00  Tea/Coffee Break

11h00 – 12h30  Plenary 5: Judicial Independence
In recent years, judges in many countries have been criticized, sometimes severely, by elected officials, the press and public for decisions in particular cases.  This plenary will examine threats to both the decisional and institutional independence of the judiciary and threats to the integrity of the criminal justice system, and the liberty of all, where an independent judiciary is absent.   The plenary will also examine the means of avoiding and responding to such threats and will provide a comparative survey on measures to secure impartiality of judicial bodies.

12h30 – 14h00              Lunch followed by Annual General Meeting of the Society

14h00 – 16h30  Workshops
Workshop A2 Police Investigations of “Politically Sensitive” or High Profile Crimes
Workshop B2 Accountability of an Independent Judiciary and Measures to Address the Corruption of the Judiciary
Workshop C2  Prosecution Independence and Discretion
Workshop D2 Amnesties and Immunities as Necessary Tools in Combatting Corruption
 (While there will be no refreshment break, coffee/tea will be available 15h00-16h00).

18h30 – 20h00  Reception
 

WEDNESDAY 29th AUGUST

DAY THEME:  Reform of the Criminal Law – a Principled Approach or Responses to Political Pressures
Crime and the responses of the criminal justice system to crime grab the headlines in the media coverage of all jurisdictions.  Politicians react to the reaction of voters to this media coverage.  In this atmosphere, is a principled approach to criminal law reform possible?

08h30 – 09h00  Registration

09h00 – 10h30 Plenary 6: The Impact of the Media on Public Perception, Political Action and Decision Making in the Justice System
This plenary will consider media influences upon the development of criminal law, justice policy and the administration of the criminal justice system.  It will also consider the use of the media to better inform the public on justice issues.

10h30 – 11h00  Tea/Coffee Break

11h00 – 12h30 Plenary 7: Law Reform Commissions:  Is There a Place for the Principled Study of Criminal Law Issues?
This plenary will review the state of Law Reform Commissions internationally and their work in the criminal law area.

Free Afternoon and Evening
 

THURSDAY 30TH AUGUST

DAY THEME:  Politics Gone Mad - Restoring Criminal Justice Systems following the Collapse of Civil Authority and the Development of International Criminal Justice Systems

Recent years have seen the collapse of civil authority in  states in several regions of the world.  Attempts to restore criminal justice systems in Haiti, Bosnia, Kosovo and East Timor have differed but there are also many lessons learned after each such experience.  This day’s sessions will focus on the situation in East Timor, with insights from and comparisons to other international initiatives to restore justice systems in areas of civil strife.  The development of ad hoc international criminal tribunals and a permanent international criminal court will also be discussed.

09h00 – 10h30 Plenary 8: The Collapse of Order in East Timor
This plenary will examine the events relating to the crisis in East Timor surrounding the widespread violence and serious human rights violations there after the popular consultation on the future status of East Timor on 30 August 1999.

10h30 – 11h00 Tea/Coffee Break

11h00 – 120h30 Plenary 9: The Administration of Criminal Justice under the East Timor UN Transitional Administration (UNTAET) and Processes to Investigate and Address Serious Human Rights Violations in East Timor
This plenary will examine the conduct of investigations of the human rights violations and violations of international humanitarian law in East Timor during the period from January 1999, identifying and prosecuting the persons responsible for those violations as well as the administration of criminal justice under the UNTAET regime.

12h30 – 14h00  Lunch

14h00 – 16h30  Workshops
Workshop A3 International Criminal Courts
Workshop B3 International Commission of Inquiry on East Timor
Workshop C3 Conducting Police Investigations in East Timor and Other “International Crisis Jurisdictions”
(While there will be no refreshment break, coffee/tea will be available from 15h00-16h00).

16h30 – 17h15 Conference Closing Michael Hill, Q.C.
President, International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law

20h00 – 23h00   Conference Dinner

The Conference Programme is subject to alteration.
 

GENERAL INFORMATION

CONFERENCE VENUE

The Opening Plenary will be held at the Old Parliament House, with the Opening Reception to follow immediately after across the street at the High Court of Australia.

Remaining plenaries and workshops will be held at the Rydges Lakeside Canberra Hotel unless otherwise specified in future versions of the Programme.

IMPORTANT DATES FOR PAPERS

Abstracts and c.v.s by        1 June 2001
Submit papers by       31 July 2001
Confirmation by Committee by        1 July 2001

All abstracts and papers to be submitted to Secretariat, I.S.R.C.L. by email at secretariat@isrcl.org

PLEASE NOTE, ONCE YOU HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED BY THE PROGRAMME COMMITTEE, AND IF YOU WANT YOUR PAPER TO BE AVAILABLE FOR DISCUSSION DURING YOUR SESSION, YOU MUST SUBMIT THE PAPER IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT BY 31 JULY 2001. WE CANNOT GUARANTEE THAT YOUR PAPER WILL BE AVAILABLE TO DELEGATES IF SUBMITTED AFTER THIS DATE.
 

REGISTRATION FEES

For registration fees, how to register and payment terms and conditions, please see the registration form.
 

ACCOMMODATION

In order to reserve accommodation at the conference hotel, please contact the hotel directly as per the details shown below.
Rydges Lakeside Canberra Hotel
London Circuit, Canberra City, ACT 2601, Australia
The hotel is situated on Lake Burley Griffin, 8 kms from Canberra Airport, in the City Centre of Canberra.  Most Plenary Sessions and Workshops will be held at the Rydges Lakeside Canberra Hotel.         Website:  www.rydges.com.au
Rates:
AU$147.00*/per room, room only - single, double, or twin share *(approx. CA$120.00, US$80.00- exchange rate may vary)
To reserve your accommodation, please contact Lenna Nuske at the Rydges Lakeside Canberra Hotel and refer to the International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law Conference.

By   e-mail      lenna_nuske@rydges.com           Tel:  61-(0)2-6247-6244                   Fax:  61-(0)2-6257-3071
 

Please contact the ISRCL Secretariat if you require information on other accommodation in the conference vicinity.
Secretariat, I.S.R.C.L., Suite 1000 –840 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2M1, Canada
Tel: (604) 643-1252    Fax: (604) 643-1200     e-mail: secretariat@isrcl.org

Some optional excursions will  be available for accompanying persons during the Conference.  If you are interested, please contact the Secretariat for details.
 

PASSPORTS & VISAS
All travellers to Australia with the exception of New Zealand citizens require a valid entry visa which must be obtained prior to arrival in Australia.  This is in addition to having a valid passport.  In many countries, an Electronic Visa or Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) can be obtained from a travel agent or an airline at the time of booking your flight.  Please check with your travel agent or airline for details.

VACCINATIONS
Anyone travelling from, or travelling through areas infected with Yellow Fever (parts of Africa and South America) must hold a current valid international certificate of inoculation against Yellow Fever.  Please check with your airline, travel agent or Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate.

WEATHER
Late August is the beginning of Spring in Canberra, with temperatures during the day ranging between 15C and 24C.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Follow up the ISRCL conference by attending the 6th Annual Conference of the International Association of Prosecutors in Sydney (a 30 minute flight from Canberra) on 2-7 September 2001.
Attendance is open to individual members (being prosecutors and former prosecutors), representatives of organisational members (being prosecuting agencies) and observers invited by the Executive Committee. If you wish to attend as an invited observer, please contact the IAP Secretary-General at the address below, providing relevant particulars (representative of the ISRCL or other allied association, criminal law expertise, etc).
The principal theme of the IAP Conference is "The Role of the Prosecutor in the New Millennium" and attention will be given to transnational organised crime, official corruption, credit card fraud, crime on the Internet, DNA evidence, disclosure, diversionary programs, technology in the courtroom, the International Criminal Court, the plight of prosecutors in developing nations and more.  For  information on the conference see the IAP website at www.iap.nl.com or the conference manager's website at www.tourhosts.com.au/iap (or e-mail iap@tourhosts.com.au);  tel (61 2) 9262 2277; fax (61 2) 9262 3135). The IAP Secretary-General may be contacted at sg@iap.nl.com; tel (31) 70 36 30 345;  fax (31) 70 36 30 367.
______________________________________________________________________________________

Attend the I.S.R.C.L. Conference and celebrate Australia’s Centenary

For information on the Society, all enquiries and membership information, contact:
Secretariat
International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law
Suite 1000, 840 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2M1, Canada
Tel: +1 604 643-1252
Fax: +1 604 643-1200
e-Mail :      secretariat@isrcl.org
Website:    www.isrcl.org


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