BACK DOOR Newsletter on East Timor .........home ...... Dec news

" ... the United Nations Security Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) until 31 January 2002, bearing in mind the possible need for adjustments related to the independence timetable. ... The current authorized deployment of nearly 8,900 Peacekeeping troops will be reduced to 5,000 troops and military observers by independence. ... Planning for UNTAET Successor Mission: Under the coordination of the Office of the SRSG, planning teams on police, military and civilian components have been established."
See also:

Sep 20 A Popular Challenge to UNTAET’s Achievements
BD: UN appointed, East Timorese, Second Transitional Government of East Timor
BD: Financing Reconstruction in East Timor
BD: Reconstruction and 'Aid & Development'

UNTAET: UNTAET Basic Facts (Fact Sheet 2)

All of the fact sheets can be downloaded in PDF format at
http://www.un.org/peace/etimor/fact/FS.htm
 

UNITED NATIONS TRANSITIONAL ADMINISTRATION IN EAST TIMOR (UNTAET)
OFFICE OF COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC INFORMATION (OCPI)

Not an official document. For information purposes only.

FACT SHEET 2

December 2001

By UNTAET Press Office
 

UNTAET BASIC FACTS
 

Mandate

By its resolution 1338 of 31 January 2001, the United Nations Security Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) until 31 January 2002, bearing in mind the possible need for adjustments related to the independence timetable. UNTAET was first established by the Security Council on 25 October 1999.

Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Transitional Administrator Sergio Vieira de Mello (Brazil)

Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General Dennis McNamara (New Zealand)

Force Commander
Lieutenant General Winai Phattiyakul (Thailand)

Chief Military Observer
Major General Sergio Rosario (Brazil)

Police Commissioner
Peter Miller (Canada)

Council of Ministers of Second Transitional Government
24 East Timorese members headed by Chief Minister Marí Alkatiri
 

UNTAET strength

The current authorized deployment of nearly 8,900 Peacekeeping troops will be reduced to 5,000 troops and military observers by independence. Reductions will include cuts in military engineering, medical, aviation and support units.  This will be achieved through scheduled troop rotations. The Civilian Police, which has a current authorized strength of 1,640, will likely be reduced to 1,250 by independence. In practical terms, however, CivPol’s downsizing will not be significantly felt as the current force of 1,133 officers is less than the authorized strength envisioned for the post independence period. By late September, UNTAET had already achieved its target of reducing international staff supporting the East Timor Public Administration by 35 per cent. Plans for a total reduction of 75 per cent are expected to be achieved by early May 2002.
 

Planning for UNTAET Successor Mission

Under the coordination of the Office of the SRSG, planning teams on police, military and civilian components have been established. These include relevant UNTAET and Second Transitional Government offices, in order to ensure full consultation with the East Timorese. The purpose of the planning teams is to outline objectives, targets and timelines for the UN successor mission,
which would come into effect upon independence. The successor mission is expected to provide security, maintain law and order, develop the East Timor Police Service, foster the respect for human rights, continue investigations and prosecutions of serious
crimes, and provide expert support in areas vital to the security and viability of the Government of East Timor.
 

Budget

• The Donors have provided a total of approximately US$ 60 million since October 1999 to support the national budget through the Consolidated Fund for East Timor (CFET). The CFET covers the recurrent costs of core functions of the government – ie wages and salaries for civil servants, goods and services and capital investment such as renovation of key government facilities.

• The Trust Fund for East Timor (TFET), administered by the World Bank, has also disbursed roughly US$ 67 million by the end of November 2001.  Spending has been in key reconstruction and development activities in the areas of health, education, agriculture, infrastructure and water and sanitation.
Funds have also been allocated at a grassroots level through the Community Empowerment Programme, while the Small Enterprise and Microfinance Programmes are designed to kick-start the private sector.

• Since 1999, the donors have contributed over US$ 600 million to East Timor for development assistance (including CFET, TFET and Bilateral assistance).

• The donors also contributed with US$ 600 million to the United Nations Assessed Budget that supports the operation of UNTAET. This fund supports the operation of 21 helicopters, four fixed-wing aircraft, three vessels and 1,400 vehicles, considerable renovation of buildings, upgrading of roads, ports, airports and communications. USD15 million has been spent in engineering over the past 20 months. UNTAET air operations have been able to assist the East Timorese population with assistance for medical emergencies and travel support for diplomats. UNTAET’s Air Medical Evacuation aircraft have carried out 640 missions in East Timor over the last 20 months of which 70% have been in support of East Timorese.

• Looking ahead, in fiscal year 2001-02 all categories of spending are expected to be higher. The CFET is scheduled to spend US$ 65 million, with increases in key areas such as education, defence and health. TFET spending is estimated to amount to approximately US$ 71 million, with spending across all TFET categories pending actualization of some donor pledges.

• The sectoral breakdown of current and proposed spending is strongly supportive of sustained longer-term development. Around 40% of TFET spending is directed towards health and education: this compares favorably with other countries at similar income levels. Over 40% of total spending is in the economic sectors of agriculture, infrastructure and support for small enterprises. Effective services in these sectors are critical to support private sector recovery and growth.


See also:

Sep 20 A Popular Challenge to UNTAET’s Achievements  Statement added Sep 20
"UNTAET has recently published in the September issue of its broadsheet Timor Tais 20 of the UN’s major achievements in East Timor. Many of these achievements are either misleading or things that UNTAET has been forced to do under pressure from Timorese people, civil society and leaders and international critics. It is time for UNTAET to be held accountable, once and for all, for not fully achieving its mandate, and for now preparing to withdraw and redefining its mandate according to the few things it has done rather than what it was supposed to do."

BD: UN appointed, East Timorese, Second Transitional Government of East Timor / Pemerintahan Transisi Kedua Timor-Timur - A collection of recent media releases, reports, articles and news

BD: Financing Reconstruction in East Timor / Fundu Ba Rekonstrusaun Timor Loro Sa’e / Bantu uang: Rékonstruksi - A collection of recent reports and articles

BD: Reconstruction and 'Aid & Development' / Rekonstrusaun i 'Ajuda i Dezenvolvimentu' / Pembangunan Kembali / Reconstrução e 'Ajuda e Desenvolvimento' - A collection of recent press releases, reports, and articles


BACK DOOR Newsletter on East Timor .........home ...... Dec news
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