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“If the UN pulls out now, without leaving in place substantial support for the fledgling judicial system and other key institutions, its investment over the past two years will be jeopardized. The UN is failing in its primary task of ensuring that the new state of East Timor has protection and promotion of human rights at its core, ... Two years on the East Timorese people are still waiting for justice. If credible trials are further delayed, the demands for an international criminal tribunal will inevitably become more insistent“ Amnesty International
See also: BD: Calls for International War Crimes Tribunal - A collection of recent reports, articles and news
also below:
Reut: E.Timor rights and justice not guaranteed: Amnesty International

AI Index ASA 57/002/2001 - News Service Nr. 123

Amnesty International

Embargoed for : 26/07/2001 15.00 GMT

East Timor: Justice at risk

With only months to go before the mandate of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) expires its job in East Timor is far from complete. Law and order is barely maintained; justice is not being administered effectively; and the human rights of the East Timorese people cannot be guaranteed, Amnesty International said today in a new report.

A reduced UN presence will remain to assist the future East Timor government after UNTAET’s mandate ends on 31 January 2002. Amnesty International today argued for human rights to be integrated into the UN’s forward planning for East Timor’s future.

“If the UN pulls out now, without leaving in place substantial support for the fledgling judicial system and other key institutions, its investment over the past two years will be jeopardized. The UN is failing in its primary task of ensuring that the new state of East Timor has protection and promotion of human rights at its core, “ said Amnesty International.

With independence fast approaching, the new judicial system is still only partially functioning and is fragile and vulnerable to interference.  Judicial officials lack the necessary support and training to make up for their lack of experience. They have also been subjected to threats and intimidation.

The rights of detainees are regularly contravened because of shortcomings in the criminal justice system. Some detainees have gone for weeks or even months without access to legal counsel, others have been held after detention orders have expired, or been arrested on the basis of laws which contravene international human rights standards.

A two tier system of justice is beginning to operate in East Timor.  Individuals who hold positions of responsibility or respect within the community have apparently used their connections to escape justice. Amnesty International’s report documents cases in which little or no action has been taken against suspected criminals who are members of unofficial security groups with links to political parties, former members of the armed group Falintil, political leaders or church officials.

“A lack of confidence in formal judicial procedures is contributing to a reliance on alternative forms of justice often to the detriment of the rights of both victims and suspects,” Amnesty International said.

In one case a woman from Maliana District who claimed to have been raped repeatedly over a period of several months in 1998 and 1999 by a local government official was forced to accept a dowry from her attacker and told not to report the case to the police.

“Alternative methods of conflict resolution have their place in many societies, but basic human rights, including the right to fair trial, are all put at risk where traditional justice is used without safeguards” Amnesty International said.

Efforts towards reconciliation in East Timor are also being badly undermined by the slow progress and questionable quality of investigations into crimes against humanity and other serious crimes committed by Indonesian security forces and pro-Indonesian militia during 1999. UNTAET’s investigations have suffered from a combination of inadequate resources, a shortage of experienced staff, poor management and a lack of political support.

Although trials of some militia members are now taking place in East Timor, even UNTAET’s limited target of filing indictments on ten priority cases by the end of the year seems unlikely to be reached. Investigations into the hundreds of other cases of unlawful killing, rape, torture and other crimes will not have been completed or even begun by the time UNTAET leaves.

Indonesia has also not fulfilled its commitment to bring to trial its nationals suspected of committing crimes against humanity in East Timor in 1999 and has also refused to cooperate with UNTAET’s investigations.

An explicit mandate and all necessary resources must be given to the UN to continue, improve and accelerate investigations and prosecutions in East Timor. At the same time the international community must make every effort to insist that Indonesia brings its nationals who are responsible for crimes in East Timor to justice in trials which meet with international standards of fair trial.

“Two years on the East Timorese people are still waiting for justice. If credible trials are further delayed, the demands for an international criminal tribunal will inevitably become more insistent”.

Read the report: East Timor: Justice past present and future
http://web.amnesty.org/ai.nsf/Index/ASA570052000?OpenDocument&of=COUNTRIES\EAST+TIMOR

\ENDS public document

For more information please call Amnesty International’s press office in
London, UK, on +44 20 7413 5566 Amnesty International, 1 Easton St., London
WC1X 0DW web : http://www.amnesty.org


Amnesty International  Updated June 21
AI is a worldwide campaigning movement that works to promote all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. AI campaigns to free all prisoners of conscience; ensure fair and prompt trials for political prisoners; abolish the death penalty, torture and other cruel treatment of prisoners; end political killings and "disappearances"; and oppose human rights abuses by opposition groups. AI has around a million members and supporters in 162 countries. Activities include public demonstrations, letter-writing, human rights education, concerts, individual appeals and global campaigns on a particular issue.
Email: hello@amnesty.org.au  Homepages: http://www.amnesty.org.au/    http://www.amnesty.org  Indonesia Web-page: http://web.amnesty.org/web/ar2001.nsf/webasacountries/INDONESIA?OpenDocument  ETimor Web-page: http://web.amnesty.org/ai.nsf/Index/ASA570052000?OpenDocument&of=COUNTRIES\EAST+TIMOR


E.Timor rights and justice not guaranteed -Amnesty

SYDNEY, July 28 (Reuters) - Justice and human rights in East Timor are still not guaranteed even though a U.N. administration in the former Indonesian territory will end its mission there in a few months, Amnesty International said.

The international human rights group said in a statement released on Saturday the United Nations was failing in its primary task of ensuring that the protection of human rights was a core issue for a newly independent East Timor.

The U.N. administration in East Timor is due to begin winding up in January 2002 but law and order is barely maintained, basic human rights are not guaranteed and justice is not being administered effectively, the rights group said.

“Unfortunately the U.N. is failing in its primary task of ensuring that the new state of East Timor has protection and promotion of human rights at its core,” said Amnesty International spokesman Tony O’Connor.

East Timor is set for is first democratic elections on August 30. No date has been set for its full independence but it is expected early next year.

A U.N. administration known as UNTAET took over the running of the territory in early 2000. It is charged with peacekeeping and the administration of East Timor in the run-up to the elections.

The U.N. administration was put in place after an Australian-led, U.N.-mandated peace enforcement mission was sent there to restore order in the wake of an August 1999 vote by East Timorese for independence after 23 years of often brutal Indonesian rule.
Pro-Jakarta militias backed by elements of the Indonesian military went on a bloody rampage in the wake of the vote to cut ties with Indonesia. Scores of East Timorese were killed in the violence and most of the capital Dili was razed.

The United Nations said on Wednesday it would begin reducing its East Timor presence after the tiny territory gained full independence in early 2002 but added it was still concerned by the militia groups across the border in Indonesian West Timor.

Amnesty International said the United Nations had a duty to leave an effective justice system and police force in place.

“If the U.N. pulls out without leaving in place substantial support for the fledgling judicial system and police, its investment over the past two years will be jeopardised,” O’Connor said.

Regional powers such as Australia have been training judges and lawyers since the UNTAET administration began and an independent judicial system is slowly being put in place. Policing is still mainly left to UNTAET.

Campaigning for East Timor’s 88-seat Constituent Assembly began on July 15.  Sixteen parties will compete for seats in the parliament, which is to draft a new constitution.

In June 2001, UNTAET numbered some 7,900 troops, 1,400 police officers and more than 1,000 civilian staff.


See also:
BD: Calls for International War Crimes Tribunal - A collection of recent reports, articles and news


BACK DOOR Newsletter on East Timor      home   July news
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