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Survey
Constitution

Updated by Robert James
21st March 2024

A non-profit organisation, which aims to provide a contact for people
interested in the psychological insights of Carl Gustav Jung.

Through monthly meetings, workshops, other activities and our library,
we seek to help people to understand their own inner journey
and the world today - from a Jungian perspective.

We normally meet at 7:30 for 8:00 pm on the first Friday of each month
at MacKillop House Conference Centre, 50 Archibald Street, Lyneham (See map)
.


Most recent meeting:
 Dr Martin Hess: "Moral Injury": video recording

See the "Archives" and the "Resources" menus to the left.


Our next Guest Speaker meeting:

Friday 5th April 2024

"Moral Injury"


Dr Martin Hess

<See the video>

at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

Moral injury occurs when a person believes or realizes accurately or not that they have compromised their own standards of conduct or have violated universal moral standards and bear significant responsibility for that violation.

Relating to the pain you've caused someone or breaking your moral code are two of the core reasons you may experience guilt. Whether you broke your partner's favorite pen, forgot an important anniversary, or cheated your way to a promotion, feeling a sense of wrongdoing is equated with the emotion of guilt. 

Moral Injury arose from the 1999 UN sponsored ballot in East Timor, known as UNAMET, of which I was a police member.

This was a seminal mission for many reasons, not the least of which was that it paved the way for the eventual independence of the nation of Timor Leste in 2002. Unfortunately, UNAMET experienced a great deal of pre-mediated violence on the part of those tasked with security and protection, the Indonesian police, military and militia proxies.

The protectors became predators and the resultant destruction of most of the infrastructure and the murder of a confirmed 1,400 (suspected 1,600) East Timorese and the forced deportations of a further 250,000 East Timorese to West Timor marred this ballot.

Due to a flawed security agreement negotiated between Indonesia and Portugal, under the auspices of the UN, unarmed UN Civilian Police (UNCIVPOL) lacked a mandate and capacity to prevent this violence as we were outnumbered and out gunned, but stood as witnesses to many of these atrocities, until we were withdrawn to Darwin under threat of death. Many UNCIVPOL stood between predator and intended prey at the extreme risk to their own lives.

The violence was so extensive that an international military intervention led by Australia (INTERFET) was raised and deployed.

Service with UNAMET was traumatic but has been overshadowed by INTERFET and has been downplayed for various reasons, including the strategic relationship between Australia and Indonesia, in the light of an ascendant China and increased Islamic jihadism. This has resulted in inadequate post mission support and recognition for police, which has compounded the trauma experienced during the mission itself.

This is a complex story with many moving parts and various agendas, which we will consider and discuss.

Dr Martin Hess
was a member of the Australian Federal Police for 30 years. Detective. Background in investigations, intelligence, surveillance, close protection and international police deployments. PhD in Australian international policing from Asia Pacific College of Diplomacy at Australian National University. Interested in inter-agency, whole if government cooperation, criminology and geo-strategic affairs.

<See the video>



Friday 3rd May 2024

"Walking the Labyrinth with Carl Jung"


Dr Kirstin Robertson-Gillam

at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

Join Kirstin for the Friday night presentation about Carl Jung's perspectives on the spiritual and psychological significance of the labyrinth. Drawing upon Jung's writings, we'll examine how this ancient technique represents the winding path of inner transformation and self-discovery.

Learn how Jung used labyrinth symbolism therapeutically with patients to access inner wisdom and integrate conscious and unconscious parts of the self. You will also learn tips for walking the labyrinth mindfully and reflecting deeply.

On Saturday afternoon, we'll have the opportunity to walk the full-sized labyrinth laid out in the grounds of the Australian Centre for Christianity & Culture in Barton. This will essentially be an open-eyed walking meditation.

Whether you're new to labyrinths or have walked many, come and explore this powerful tool for centering and personal growth.

Emerge renewed from this winding journey toward inner truth with a deepened connection to your authentic self and a feeling of sacred wholeness from integrating shadow and light on the labyrinth path.

Dr Kirstin Robertson-Gillam completed a psychology major in her BA degree along with ethnomusicology and musicology majors at the University of New England. She then did a number of higher degrees at Western Sydney University: A of Master Counselling; a Master of Arts (Hons); and, a PhD. Her PhD focused on reducing depression in mid to later life by participating in a community choir therapy program to reduce depression in mid to later life.

You can contact Kirstin directly:
Phone: (0409) 533 466
Email: kirstinrg@bigpond.com
Web: www.kirstinrg.com

We meet from 7:30 pm for tea and coffee and snacks, music, discussion and library.
The Guest Speaker's presentation is at 8pm for an hour or so,
then we resume for questions and discussion, finishing by 10 pm.

Cost for attendance (at MacKillop House):
   Jung Society members free,
   Guests $15 (Seniors/Concession $10),
   Pay by bank transfer or by credit card or PayPal via TryBooking.

Cost for on-line access:
   Jung Society members free (We'll send you a link).
   Guests $10:
   Pay by bank transfer or by credit card or PayPal via TryBooking.

 



Saturday 4th may 2024  10am - 12 noon (Workshop experience)

"Walking the Labyrinth with Carl Jung"


Dr Kirstin Robertson-Gillam


At the Australian Centre for Christianity & Culture, 15 Blackhall Street, Barton.

On Saturday morning, we'll have the opportunity to walk the full-sized labyrinth laid out in the grounds of the Australian Centre for Christianity & Culture in Barton.

This will essentially be an open-eyed walking meditation.

Time 10am - 12 noon.

For more details of the Garden, see
  * The Bible Garden (csu.edu.au)   
  * The Bible Garden | VisitCanberra


Dr Kirstin Robertson-Gillam completed a psychology major in her BA degree along with ethnomusicology and musicology majors at the University of New England. She then did a number of higher degrees at Western Sydney University: A of Master Counselling; a Master of Arts (Hons); and, a PhD. Her PhD focused on reducing depression in mid to later life by participating in a community choir therapy program to reduce depression in mid to later life.

You can contact Kirstin directly:
   Phone: (0409) 533 466
   Email: kirstinrg@bigpond.com
   Web: www.kirstinrg.com


Friday 7th June 2024

"Disinformation: a Jungian Perspective"


John Gillam


at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

Disinformation, defined as the deliberate provision of misleading information, can be understood by using Carl Jung's profound insights into the collective unconscious and archetypal dynamics. Jung did not specifically address the concept of disinformation in the modern sense during his lifetime. However, his work on the collective unconscious, archetypes, and the exploration of the shadow aspects of the psyche provides insights that can be applied to the understanding of disinformation.

Jung's main message, when extrapolated to the issue of disinformation, revolves around the profound influence of unconscious elements on human behavior and perception. He emphasised the existence of archetypes—universal symbols and themes deeply ingrained in the collective unconscious of humanity. These archetypes, such as the hero, the shadow, and others, serve as powerful templates that shape human experiences and narratives.

In the context of disinformation, Jung's insights suggest that manipulators may tap into these archetypal elements to evoke specific emotional responses and shape public opinion. The deliberate use of symbols, narratives, and cultural references in disinformation campaigns can exploit these deep-seated psychological patterns, influencing individuals on a subconscious level.

Jung's exploration of the shadow - the hidden, often repressed, aspects of the individual and collective psyche - offers a cautionary perspective. Disinformation may thrive by amplifying societal fears, biases, and prejudices present in the collective shadow. Jung's message underscores the importance of acknowledging and confronting these hidden elements to foster a more self-aware and resilient society.

Join us for a journey into the murky waters of disinformation, gaining insights into psychological mechanisms and how Jung's guidance can help unravel misleading narratives. A must for those navigating psychology and disinformation in today's world!

John Gillam, a retired librarian and former technology innovations officer at the National Library of Australia, contributed to cost reduction initiatives by helping to implement an online national shared bibliographic database for publications.

His expertise extended to assisting in the development of the Australian national satellite system over a decade, eventually earning him the position of European Manager for a leading Australian telecommunications company. The latter part of his career was focused on Freedom of Information processing and contributing to government efforts in analysing foreign interference in Australia’s democratic systems.

In retirement, John continues to actively engage with the ever-evolving landscape of information dissemination through various media, publications, and the internet.



Friday 5th July 2024

"Seeing Your True Nature:
The Headless Way Approach to Self-Inquiry
"


Dr Brentyn Ramm

at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

Contemplative traditions have variously described your true nature as void-like, empty and yet full of the world, a clear light, pure awareness.

Douglas Harding developed innovative experiments for directly seeing your true nature. This approach, the Headless Way, is simple and practical and offers techniques for investigating who or what you really are for yourself. As a first-person method of self-inquiry,

it is based upon your own experience, hence, you are the authority - no one else. Brentyn will introduce the Headless Way approach and guide the audience through some Douglas Harding’s first-person experiments.

Dr Brentyn Ramm is a philosopher whose research focuses on using first-person experimental methods to inform the nature of consciousness and the self. He is based in Sydney and a guest scientist at Witten/Herdecke University.

He was a Humboldt postdoctoral fellow at Witten/Herdecke University (Germany) in the Department of Psychology and Psychotherapy, 2021-2023. He completed his philosophy PhD in the School of Philosophy at the Australian National University in 2016. He also completed a PhD in cognitive psychology at the University of Queensland in 2006.



Friday 2nd August 2024

"Is My Enemy's Enemy, My Friend?
AI as Spiritual Companion"


Dr Nikolai Blaskow

at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

Friedrich Nietzsche:
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

René Girard:
“Scandal” means, not one of those ordinary obstacles that we avoid easily after we run into it the first time, but a paradoxical obstacle that is almost impossible to avoid: the more this obstacle, or scandal repels us, the more it attracts us. Scandals are responsible for the false infinity of mimetic rivalry …"

Dr Nikolai Blaskow is an Adjunct Research Fellow with Charles Sturt University, located at the Centre for Christianity and Culture. He is currently working on a Book focused on AI and the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) exploring the existential, philosophical, psychological and theological implications of AI.

He teaches English Literature at Narrabundah College, Canberra ACT.

For more examples of Dr Blaskow's presentations, see eg: Dr Nikolai David Blaskow - YouTube.


C
ost for attendance (at MacKillop House):
Jung Society members free,
Guests $15 (Seniors/Concession $10),
Pay cash at the door, or by bank transfer or by credit card via TryBooking.

Cost for on-line access:
Jung Society members free (We'll send you a link).
Guests $10,
Pay by bank transfer or by credit card or PayPal via TryBooking.

We meet from 7:30 pm for tea and coffee and snacks, music, discussion and library.
The Guest Speaker's presentation is at 8pm for an hour or so,
then we resume for questions and discussion, finishing by 10 pm.


Friday 6th September 2024

"Homage to Glenda”


With Dr Craig San Roque

at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

This, Craig's second event for the year, will be a kind of ‘Homage to Glenda’ - reflections on themes of Glenda Cloughley’s life and works - told from my personal experience with her from 1988 to 2023.

It may be that this would work better as a Sunday afternoon symposium style event.

Details to be advised.

Dr Craig San Roque: As well as psychological practice in diverse settings, Craig’s published works include:
* the award winning graphic novel The Long Weekend in Alice Springs, Sydney/Purgatorio,
* The Second Goya (on the American oligarch) in Singer’s Cultural Complexes and the Soul of America and a keynote talk:
* An Older Voice - Things I heard in Warlpiri Country @ the 2023 Freud Conference, Indigenous Voice/s Psychoanalytic Listening.

We meet from 7:30 pm for tea and coffee and snacks, music, discussion and library.
The Guest Speaker's presentation is at 8pm for an hour or so,
then we resume for questions and discussion, finishing by 10 pm.

Cost for attendance (at MacKillop House):
Jung Society members free,
Guests $15 (Seniors/Concession $10),
Pay by bank transfer or by vredit card or PayPal via TryBooking.

Cost for on-line access:
Jung Society members free (We'll send you a link).
Guests $10:
Pay by bank transfer or by credit card or PayPal via TryBooking.



SPECIAL EVENT

Saturday Workshop in October

"Carl Jung: His Passion of Unconscious Forces

and our Capacity to be both Self-Centred and Selfless"


 
Dr David Russell

 

    Programme:

    10 am:
         Presentation

    11am - 12noon:
         Q & A

    12noon - 1pm:
         Lunch

    1pm – 2pm:
         Presentation:
         "The life cycle of one’s therapeutic practice from the initial enthusiasm
         through to the inevitable ‘growing old’ through to a necessary rebirth"

    2-pm – 3pm:
         Group Discussion


Summary:

Both intuitively and experimentally, Jung was convinced that this interplay of our capacity to be both self-centred and selfless was at the heart of his life’s work.

Jung used the term ‘complex’ to convey the interplay not just between our capacity to be self-centred and selfless but also between conscious and unconscious experiences.

The term is used to express feelings, images, emotions, thoughts and ideas. Jung referred to it as a feeling-toned complex. What we have is a network of images-awash-with-emotions. An emotion is not a thing, rather, it is a collection of processes preparing us for action.


The complexes appear physically in our symptoms and walk around nightly in our dreams … we are always unconscious; the unconscious is everywhere.

Our dreams manifest our capacity to be both compassionate, loving and mean spirited, selfish. The dark side of our psyche/mind is always present along-side out light side. How could it be otherwise. Denying our psychological dark side makes it easy to unconsciously turn our spiritual life into an achievement; thus, a commodification of desire.

I invite you to listen to the folk story of The Three Feathers.

Following the telling of the story I’ll illustrate its archetypal nature and the relationship between the archetype of the Self and the ego complex.


Some key issues;

  * How our brains create our own and our shared reality

  * How our social reality is in constant change

  * Our individual agency

  * Unconscious, pre-conscious and conscious processes.


Dr David Russell's initial studies were at the Pontifical University in Rome, Italy. His main area of study were the works of two Spanish mystics, John of the Cross and Teresa of Avila.

Back in Sydney he studied psychology completing his BSc (Hons) and the PhD. After a couple of years in private practice he joined the fledgling Western Sydney University and taught first in the Department of Social Ecology and then in the School of Psychology.

The high point of his academic career was initiating, along with Dr Brendon Stewart, the Master of Analytical Psychology degree based on the works of Carl Jung and post Jungian writers.


On leaving the university he moved back into private practice where he is still engaged on a part-time basis.  During this latter period, he was Present of the Sydney Jung Society for a number of years.


 

Friday 5th October 2024

"Fear and Terror in Shaping Conceptions of the Ghost”


With Dr Charlotte-Rose Millar

at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham ACT (and by Zoom)

In early modern England, ghosts represented a point of tension between pre and post-Reformation belief. In pre-Reformation doctrine ghosts could be one of three things: beings sent from God, beings sent from the Devil, or the departed souls of the dead.

Post-Reformation England’s official rejection of the doctrine of purgatory should have meant the figurative death of the ghost as dead person; yet it didn’t.  For centuries after the Reformation, ghost stories flourished, with a significant proportion of these stories featuring tales of murdered men and women coming back to life to avenge their deaths; of the dead unable to rest until they had righted a societal wrong; or even of helpful spirits returning from the grave to do chores around the house.

Despite the early modern emphasis on ghosts as angels or demons, many men and women still had an emotional reaction to what they believed was the spirit of a departed person. Emotional experience was fundamental to how ghosts were interpreted and, I suggest, crucial to their continuation within a period of large-scale religious change.

This talk will explore how the confusion surrounding ghost beliefs in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries led to the ghost becoming imbued with greater fear than ever before. The ghost’s newfound demonic agency, coupled with ongoing conceptions of the ghost as departed soul, combined to create a new version of the ghost. As such, this talk will explore how emotions such as fear, terror, consternation, and amazement were all fundamental in shaping conceptions of the ghost.

Dr Charlotte-Rose Millar is Lecturer in History at the University of Melbourne. Her work focuses on early modern English print culture, supernatural belief, the history of emotions, and diabolism.

She has held fellowships at the University of Queensland and the University of Cambridge. Her first book, "Witchcraft, the Devil and Emotions in Early Modern England" was published by Routledge in 2017. Her second book, "Haunting Emotions: Space and the Supernatural in Early Modern England" is under contract with Manchester University Press. She is also the author of volume three of Bloomsbury’s six volume series "A Cultural History of Magic".

We meet from 7:30 pm for tea and coffee and snacks, music, discussion and library.
The Guest Speaker's presentation is at 8pm for an hour or so,
then we resume for questions and discussion, finishing by 10 pm.

Cost for attendance (at MacKillop House):
   Jung Society members free,
   Guests $15 (Seniors/Concession $10),
   Pay by bank transfer or by credit card or PayPal via TryBooking.

Cost for on-line access:
   Jung Society members free (We'll send you a link).
   Guests $10:
   Pay by bank transfer or by credit card or PayPal via TryBooking.


Disclaimer:

The Canberra Jung Society Inc. does not endorse and is not to be held responsible for the content of any lecture or advertisement, nor is any information or advice a substitute for professional counselling and therapy.

If you believe that we have inadvertently breached any copyright provision, please let us know and we will immediately rectify the matter.


Cost:
  *
Monthly Friday meetings:
      * For non-members is $15 or $10 Seniors/Concession (members free).

  * Special Events (eg workshops):
      * Costs are specific to those events.

  * Annual Membership entitles members to:
        * attend our 10 meetings at no cost,
        * receive two newsletters per year, and
        * share access to our extensive library.

     Cost for membership for a full year is $75 (or $60 concession), to be paid in March each year,
   
  * Pay at the door, or by bank transfer, or with credit card at TryBooking.


Everyone is welcome. 

We normally meet at 7:30pm on the first Friday each month for music and coffee and chat,
Guest Speaker at 8pm, break for supper around 9pm, resume for questions and discussion until 10pm.

Location: Usually at MacKillop House, 50 Archibald St, Lyneham, ACT.
                *** Please check the website for any changes to date/time and locaton of events ***

Web:   www.CanberraJungSociety.org.au

Email:  CanberraJungSociety@yahoo.com 
Postal: PO Box 82, Belconnen, ACT 2612, Australia