SOLAR SYSTEM GALAXIES

STAR CLUSTERS

NEBULAE EPSILON 180 IMAGES

HOME

SOLAR SYSTEM IMAGES

Given the small size of the planets in the sky (the largest is only about 50 arcsec. in diameter), some extra magnification is necesssary to make the disk a reasonable size. I mainly use eyepiece projection with a 24mm eyepiece but I have experimented with using a 2.5x Barlow. A camera with small pixels, such as the ST-5C, makes prime focus photography feasible. The ST-5C images are now quite old and I usually use a digital camera for solar and lunar images these days.  I've also started using a Phillips Toucam Pro webcam for planetary images.  

Some of the pictures on this page were taken with my original ST-6 which was retired in 2001.

To see images from the 2003 mars opposition, click here 

To see some images of the sun in white light and hydrogen alpha, click here

To see images of the 2004 Venus transit, click here

To see some mediocre webcam planet images, click here

To see an image from the 2008 China solar eclipse, click here

To see some moon images (mostly old), click here




The northern hemisphere got by far the best of Hale-Bopp. This ST-6 tri-colour was taken with my C11 in early July 1996.


Saturn with Titan shadow in transit. Taken with C11, 24mm eyepiece projection on 10 September 1995


Venus in blue light. Taken with C14 at F11 and ST-5C on 26 July 1999.


Jupiter RGB image. Taken with C14 at F11 and ST-5C on 28 November 1999 (R=.1,G=.05,B=.1).


Saturn. Taken with C14 with 2.5X Barlow and ST-5C on 3 January 2000.

170499mr.JPG (5504 bytes)

Probably my best mars b/w image from 1999.  Taken with C14 and ST-6 with 24mm eyepiece projection in red light on 17 April 1999.

140599mc.JPG (6955 bytes)

Probably my best mars colour image from 1999.  Taken with C14 and ST-6 with 24mm eyepiece projection on 14 May 1999.